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// Copyright (C) 2009 Laboratoire de Recherche et Développement
// de l'Epita (LRDE).
// Copyright (C) 2003, 2004, 2005 Laboratoire d'Informatique de
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// Paris 6 (LIP6), département Systèmes Répartis Coopératifs (SRC),
// Université Pierre et Marie Curie.
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//
// This file is part of Spot, a model checking library.
//
// Spot is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
// under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
// the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
// (at your option) any later version.
//
// Spot is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT
// ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY
// or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public
// License for more details.
//
// You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
// along with Spot; see the file COPYING.  If not, write to the Free
// Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA
// 02111-1307, USA.

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#ifndef SPOT_TGBA_TGBA_HH
# define SPOT_TGBA_TGBA_HH

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#include "state.hh"
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#include "succiter.hh"
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#include "bdddict.hh"
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namespace spot
{
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  /// \defgroup tgba TGBA (Transition-based Generalized Büchi Automata)
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  ///
  /// Spot is centered around the spot::tgba type.  This type and its
  /// cousins are listed \ref tgba_essentials "here".  This is an
  /// abstract interface.  Its implementations are either \ref
  /// tgba_representation "concrete representations", or \ref
  /// tgba_on_the_fly_algorithms "on-the-fly algorithms".  Other
  /// algorithms that work on spot::tgba are \ref tgba_algorithms
  /// "listed separately".

  /// \addtogroup tgba_essentials Essential TGBA types
  /// \ingroup tgba

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  /// \brief A Transition-based Generalized Büchi Automaton.
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  /// \ingroup tgba_essentials
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  ///
  /// The acronym TGBA (Transition-based Generalized Büchi Automaton)
  /// was coined by Dimitra Giannakopoulou and Flavio Lerda
  /// in "From States to Transitions: Improving Translation of LTL
  /// Formulae to Büchi Automata".  (FORTE'02)
  ///
  /// TGBAs are transition-based, meanings their labels are put
  /// on arcs, not on nodes.  They use Generalized Büchi acceptance
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  /// conditions: there are several acceptance sets (of
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  /// transitions), and a path can be accepted only if it traverses
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  /// at least one transition of each set infinitely often.
  ///
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  /// Browsing such automaton can be achieved using two functions:
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  /// \c get_init_state, and \c succ_iter.  The former returns
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  /// the initial state while the latter lists the
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  /// successor states of any state.
  ///
  /// Note that although this is a transition-based automata,
  /// we never represent transitions!  Transition informations are
  /// obtained by querying the iterator over the successors of
  /// a state.
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  class tgba
  {
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  protected:
    tgba();
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  public:
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    virtual ~tgba();

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    /// \brief Get the initial state of the automaton.
    ///
    /// The state has been allocated with \c new.  It is the
    /// responsability of the caller to \c delete it when no
    /// longer needed.
    virtual state* get_init_state() const = 0;
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    /// \brief Get an iterator over the successors of \a local_state.
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    ///
    /// The iterator has been allocated with \c new.  It is the
    /// responsability of the caller to \c delete it when no
    /// longer needed.
    ///
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    /// During synchornized products, additional informations are
    /// passed about the entire product and its state.  Recall that
    /// products can be nested, forming a tree of spot::tgba where
    /// most values are computed on demand.  \a global_automaton
    /// designate the root spot::tgba, and \a global_state its
    /// state.  This two objects can be used by succ_iter() to
    /// restrict the set of successors to compute.
    ///
    /// \param local_state The state whose successors are to be explored.
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    /// This pointer is not adopted in any way by \c succ_iter, and
    /// it is still the caller's responsability to delete it when
    /// appropriate (this can be done during the lifetime of
    /// the iterator).
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    /// \param global_state In a product, the state of the global
    /// product automaton.  Otherwise, 0.  Like \a locale_state,
    /// \a global_state is not adopted by \c succ_iter.
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    /// \param global_automaton In a product, the global
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    /// product automaton.  Otherwise, 0.
    virtual tgba_succ_iterator*
    succ_iter(const state* local_state,
	      const state* global_state = 0,
	      const tgba* global_automaton = 0) const = 0;

    /// \brief Get a formula that must hold whatever successor is taken.
    ///
    /// \return A formula which must be verified for all successors
    ///  of \a state.
    ///
    /// This can be as simple as \c bddtrue, or more completely
    /// the disjunction of the condition of all successors.  This
    /// is used as an hint by \c succ_iter() to reduce the number
    /// of successor to compute in a product.
    ///
    /// Sub classes should implement compute_support_conditions(),
    /// this function is just a wrapper that will cache the
    /// last return value for efficiency.
    bdd support_conditions(const state* state) const;

    /// \brief Get the conjunctions of variables tested by
    ///        the outgoing transitions of \a state.
    ///
    /// All variables tested by outgoing transitions must be
    /// returned.  This is mandatory.
    ///
    /// This is used as an hint by some \c succ_iter() to reduce the
    /// number of successor to compute in a product.
    ///
    /// Sub classes should implement compute_support_variables(),
    /// this function is just a wrapper that will cache the
    /// last return value for efficiency.
    bdd support_variables(const state* state) const;
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    /// \brief Get the dictionary associated to the automaton.
    ///
    /// State are represented as BDDs.  The dictionary allows
    /// to map BDD variables back to formulae, and vice versa.
    /// This is useful when dealing with several automata (which
    /// may use the same BDD variable for different formula),
    /// or simply when printing.
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    virtual bdd_dict* get_dict() const = 0;
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    /// \brief Format the state as a string for printing.
    ///
    /// This formating is the responsability of the automata
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    /// that owns the state.
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    virtual std::string format_state(const state* state) const = 0;
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    /// \brief Return a possible annotation for the transition
    /// pointed to by the iterator.
    ///
    /// Implementing this function is optional; the default annotation
    /// it the empty string.
    ///
    /// \param t a non-done tgba_succ_iterator for this automata
    virtual std::string
    transition_annotation(const tgba_succ_iterator* t) const;

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    /// \brief Project a state on an automaton.
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    ///
    /// This converts \a s, into that corresponding spot::state for \a
    /// t.  This is useful when you have the state of a product, and
    /// want restrict this state to a specific automata occuring in
    /// the product.
    ///
    /// It goes without saying that \a s and \a t should be compatible
    /// (i.e., \a s is a state of \a t).
    ///
    /// \return 0 if the projection fails (\a s is unrelated to \a t),
    ///    or a new \c state* (the projected state) that must be
    ///    deleted by the caller.
    virtual state* project_state(const state* s, const tgba* t) const;

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    /// \brief Return the set of all acceptance conditions used
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    /// by this automaton.
    ///
    /// The goal of the emptiness check is to ensure that
    /// a strongly connected component walks through each
    /// of these acceptiong conditions.  I.e., the union
    /// of the acceptiong conditions of all transition in
    /// the SCC should be equal to the result of this function.
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    virtual bdd all_acceptance_conditions() const = 0;
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    /// The number of acceptance conditions.
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    virtual unsigned int number_of_acceptance_conditions() const;
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    /// \brief Return the conjuction of all negated acceptance
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    /// variables.
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    ///
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    /// For instance if the automaton uses variables <tt>Acc[a]</tt>,
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    /// <tt>Acc[b]</tt> and <tt>Acc[c]</tt> to describe acceptance sets,
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    /// this function should return <tt>!Acc[a]\&!Acc[b]\&!Acc[c]</tt>.
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    ///
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    /// This is useful when making products: each operand's condition
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    /// set should be augmented with the neg_acceptance_conditions() of
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    /// the other operand.
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    virtual bdd neg_acceptance_conditions() const = 0;
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  protected:
    /// Do the actual computation of tgba::support_conditions().
    virtual bdd compute_support_conditions(const state* state) const = 0;
    /// Do the actual computation of tgba::support_variables().
    virtual bdd compute_support_variables(const state* state) const = 0;
  private:
    mutable const state* last_support_conditions_input_;
    mutable bdd last_support_conditions_output_;
    mutable const state* last_support_variables_input_;
    mutable bdd last_support_variables_output_;
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    mutable int num_acc_;
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  };
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  /// \addtogroup tgba_representation TGBA representations
  /// \ingroup tgba

  /// \addtogroup tgba_algorithms TGBA algorithms
  /// \ingroup tgba
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  /// \addtogroup tgba_on_the_fly_algorithms TGBA on-the-fly algorithms
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms

  /// \addtogroup tgba_io Input/Output of TGBA
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms

  /// \addtogroup tgba_ltl Translating LTL formulae into TGBA
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms

  /// \addtogroup tgba_generic Algorithm patterns
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms

  /// \addtogroup tgba_reduction TGBA simplifications
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms

  /// \addtogroup tgba_misc Miscellaneous algorithms on TGBA
  /// \ingroup tgba_algorithms
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}
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#endif // SPOT_TGBA_TGBA_HH